CapRelo Blog

Making a Global Footprint

Posted by Barry Morris on Thu, Dec 13, 2018

global footprint

According to the U.S. Small Business Administration, 96 percent of the world’s consumers live outside of America. That’s almost 2 billion people. To get access to this growing class, companies may need to expand to new shores.

There are many opportunities and benefits that come with doing business abroad. Government incentives and foreign investment opportunities aside, doing business internationally also offers a competitive advantage when it comes to technology, industry ecosystems and talent. Access to larger, more diverse talent pools offers companies unique advantages in terms of increased productivity, advanced language skills and diverse educational backgrounds.

And while the prospect of international may seem daunting, having a global partner to help you will ease those worries.

At CapRelo, we can help because we’ve expanded too. Over the years, we’ve grown from our Virginia operation to having a true tri-regional presence in Canada, China, Germany, India, Malaysia, Singapore and the U.K. Establishing these bases of operations was key to understanding and meeting our clients' global mobility needs, and sets CapRelo apart as a global mobility management company.

Whether your company wants to expand its horizon into a new market or secure the hottest global talent from anywhere else in the world, we can help. We deliver quicker data, quicker answers, so you can make smart talent decisions faster.

Streamline Success

Topics: global mobility, global mobility management

Controlling Global Assignment Costs

Posted by Amy Mergler on Thu, Dec 06, 2018

Business man pulling a big green dollar sign concept on background

Finding a balance between employee support and cost management when overseeing global assignments is a challenge, but it can be done. Most importantly, it's imperative to properly plan for assignments and actively manage expenses.

No two global assignments are identical, so rather than creating a one-size-fits-all solution, you may opt to evaluate some custom-fit solutions that take the bigger picture into consideration to create opportunities to save. In addition, you may consider these measures to help manage and reduce global assignment costs.

Assignment Cost Control Measures

  • Establish goals and select the appropriate candidate for the assignment. To avoid the cost of a failed assignment, one of the most important steps is to properly plan your business goals and objectives to screen candidates and identify the best talent for the assignment. Candidates can be assessed not only on their job skills, but also on their ability to manage and adapt to a different culture and environment.
  • Review your assignment program regularly. There may be areas in your program where minor adjustments can be made to reduce costs without negatively impacting employees. For each possible adjustment, analyze how it will impact the relocation process and how it will affect your employee's productivity during the assignment.
  • Regulate cost-of-living allowances. There may be a significant difference between the costs of living in originating and host countries. Set allowances that are applicable to their respective locations, and recalculate cost-of-living subsidies regularly to reflect financial fluctuations in the host country's economy. Use a salary cap when calculating the COLA to further contain costs.
  • Reevaluate host country housing guidelines. To control housing expenses, employ more conservative standards to determine guidelines for host housing using the most current data available. Remember to review and adjust the guidelines regularly to account for local real estate value and currency fluctuations.
  • Lower house-hunting trip reimbursements. International airfare, transportation at the location, as well as lodging and food can be expensive. Reduce these costs by limiting the number of days allocated for these trips. Unless necessary for school enrollment, limit trips to the employee and spouse/partner only.
  • Reassess the costs of language training, cultural training services, home-finding and familiarization trips. Though these services are often crucial to an employee's successful assignment, you may be able to do some research and compare providers to determine if there are more cost-effective ways to provide them, such as providing web-based language training. Pay attention to service quality and client satisfaction to ensure you make both cost-effective and responsible decisions.

Managing Global Assignment Costs

Topics: global assignment costs, managing costs, global assignments, global mobility, global relocation

Understanding Global Assignment Costs

Posted by Amy Mergler on Fri, Nov 16, 2018

Plane flying above skyscrapers-cropped

Confidence in the economy is rising, and with it, the number of companies seeking to establish, strengthen or expand their positions globally is increasing. Often, this involves expatriating talent to fill key positions in other countries. Some companies will also provide global assignment opportunities to expand their employees' knowledge and skills.

Whether your company is well versed or new to managing global assignments, the
cost of them can be daunting. However, when appropriately planned for and managed, global assignments can positively impact a company’s global business goals.

Sending an employee and a family of three on a three-year global assignment could
cost in excess of USD $1 million. So, it’s not surprising that many global companies
believe traditional overseas assignments are cost-prohibitive. Some companies have
reduced, frozen or even eliminated their global assignment programs. However, to
remain competitive, companies still need to place the best talent at the appropriate
locations, and often that talent isn’t available without a global transfer. This is when
the proper management and oversight of relocation costs becomes imperative.

Understanding the Costs

If you’re planning global assignments, there are ways to scale back costs without
compromising operations or impacting employee productivity. Finding that balance
between employee support and cost management to successfully oversee global
assignments is a challenge, but it can be done. Below is a list of some of the expenses
businessman hand working with new modern computer-croppedassociated with a global assignment:

  • Candidate Assessment – Conducted by the company to determine if the employee is the right candidate for the global assignment.
  • Pre-Decision Assessment – Aligns the individual needs of the employee and the employee's family with the business goals of the assignment.
  • Immigration – Obtaining the appropriate documentation for the assignment. The reason for the assignment will dictate the appropriate visa type.
  • Tax Implications – Determining the tax implications of the assignment and responsibilities of both the company and the employee. 
  • Tax Assistance – Providing the employee with tax assistance, which could include consultation; preparation (for both home and host countries); filing (for both home and host countries); tax equalization.
  • Host Country Housing – Providing reasonable and customary rent and utility costs for the employee's housing in the host country according to regional guidelines based on family size and location.
  • Allowances – Ongoing payments made, separate from base salary, during the assignment: 
    • Cost-of-Living Allowance (COLA) – An allowance or differential paid to the employee for similar goods and services in the host location that they have int he home location based on family size and salary. Intended to cover costs to purchase host country goods and services over those from the home country.
    • Transportation – An allowance for a car for the duration of the assignment, the amount of which may vary by location and family size.
    • Hardship – An allowance paid in addition to salary and COLA for assignments in locations designated as a hardship for the employee based on factors that include potential violence, incidence of disease, medical care quality, geographic isolation and availability of goods and services.
  • Miscellaneous Expense Allowance – One-time payment made, separate from base salary, intended to cover expenses not expressly covered in the Letter of Understanding, like renter's insurance, obtaining a new driver's license, immunizations, taxis, etc.
  • Cultural/Language Training – Provided to the employee and the family to assist in understanding  the host country culture and language.
  • Home Finding and Destination Services – Locating housing in the host country, as well as registering with local authorities and setting up accounts.
  • Departure Services – Home sale, property management, lease termination, etc.
  • Global Household Goods – Transporting (via land, air and/or sea) or storing household goods and personal effects.
  • Temporary Living – Fully furnished housing at the destination location.
  • Repatriation – Return of the employee to the home country at assignment completion.

Managing Global Assignment Costs

Topics: global assignments, global mobility, managing costs, global assignment costs

My Way, Your Way, Our Way in Global Mobility Programs

Posted by CapRelo on Tue, Oct 09, 2018

Today, we are joined by guest author, Nigel Ewington from TCO International.

Our WayRecently I got the opportunity to work with a Global Mobility professional who told me a story about a loss of trust she experienced in some global colleagues. She was feeling frustrated and let-down by the actions of some colleagues who had failed to follow the policy they had agreed together. It was made worse by the fact that she had only found out about the actions indirectly.

She was a Global Mobility VP working for a global manufacturing company and responsible for a tri-regional mobility program with key mobility stakeholders in Germany and China. This program was currently occupied with moving some German managers into China. The Mobility function had recently been through a process of drawing up and agreeing on new policy, with a strict set of processes to follow across the globe. Despite seeming to have secured agreement to these new policies from her regional colleagues at a three-way meeting in the USA, the Global Mobility VP had found out that one key area of policy linked to Transportation had been flouted in China. It seemed that the rules had been broken for a German C-suite executive moving to China, and no one had bothered to inform her.

On exploring the story more deeply, I learned that during the meeting itself the Global Mobility VP had presented her ideas about a new mobility policy and asked for reactions. She feared lack of buy-in from German team members, who asked her lots of difficult questions in response to her question. She had not anticipated that the flouting of the policy would come from her Chinese colleagues. At the meeting they had listened respectfully and merely commented that they were “grateful for these directions” and “would do their very best” to implement them. She left the meeting confident that buy-in had taken place. She was now mystified as to why this hadn’t happened.

As I reflected on the story, it seemed to me to be symptomatic of a key challenge besetting global mobility. In this VUCA (Volatile. Uncertain. Complex. Ambiguous) world, global mobility professionals themselves have to respond to the shifting needs of their internal customers by collaborating together as one global team with one shared policy across a number of locations. Here complexity is increased by the challenge of cultural differences and distance. They are faced with the challenge of who owns Global Mobility globally, and how to make new levels of global collaboration work

If the ownership of Global Mobility is now dispersed globally, it takes special sensitivity to make sure that the cross-border collaboration is effective. The communication problem our VP faced here was not a lack of clarity nor a lack of respect, but a failure to get real buy-in from her global colleagues.

While it is a universal truth that as human beings we all love to communicate our intentions, this story reveals that we have different cultural assumptions about how to go about doing this. Chinese tend to be higher-context in their communication style, avoiding over-direct use of text and assuming that their important messages will be read between the lines. Inference, body language and situational cues are the tools of the high-context communicator. Germans on the other hand, tend to be lower-context in style, preferring to communicate the critical nature of what they are thinking more directly in the exact text of what they say. They are more direct in challenging others, even when maintaining a good relationship is critical to them. Americans – sitting culturally in the middle of these two other cultures – may misconstrue the Chinese indirectness for agreement and the German critical feedback for aggression. Here, a failure to understand the Your Way of effective communication, and how it may differ from My Way may compromise the formulation of a workable global Our Way for moving forward globally.

The lack of cultural sensitivity revealed in this case was not only a question of communication. I learned that the Global Mobility VP had dug deeper into the exact local context in which there had been a flouting of the Transportation allowance policy. In this organization’s policy, assignees are given a Transportation allowance of USD 1,000 per month used to subsidize transportation needs. Such needs include car rental, use of taxis, etc. In China, due to the regulations, expats are not encouraged to drive on their own, and car rentals tend to come with a driver instead. The German C-suite executive assumed that the car and driver was an entitlement and demanded the full costs to pay for it, although the intention was to subsidize the cost, not pay the full entitlement. Local HR acquiesced and paid from another budget.

If we accept that the Chinese mobility team was aware of the rules, despite having some concerns that they had not voiced at the meeting in the US, why did they simply not follow them? Is this possibly another cultural factor relating to understand the “your way” of global collaboration, or is it simply a lack of professionalism?

Research indicates that cultures have different assumptions about rules vs. exceptions. In all cultures we need to find the right balance between knowing when to follow the rule regardless of the context, and when to adapt the rule according to special circumstances.  Some cultures can be described as “universalist,” where people tend to follow the rule regardless of the context in which it is applied. In “particularist” cultures, on the other hand, rules always need to be reinterpreted to meet the needs of particular people in particular contexts. Very often like China, such “particularist” cultures tend to be also “hierarchical” in style, where people tend to maximize the deference and privileges given to bosses, rather than minimize them.

This “particularist,” hierarchical side of Chinese culture and the flexible approach to rules that ensues can be a source of frustration to “universalist” global partners, but it can provide the sensitive handling of the delicate needs of key stakeholders locally that is critical to the implementation of mobility programs

In reflecting on the learning from this story, it occurred to me that one of the features of this story is the gap between intentions and impact, which is typical of breakdowns in global collaboration. Both sides have positive intentions in what they do and say, but due to a smokescreen of instinctive cultural styles the impact is often negative. To get real buy-in in a world where ownership of global mobility is dispersed across locations, the Global Mobility VP should have avoided leading with a presentation of her own first draft of policy, before getting reactions. Instead she could have framed the intentions of policy, and before getting to drafting rules of guidelines, she should have listened and explored how key stakeholders would implement those intentions in key global locations. In this way she would have learned about some of the cultural differences – both of the “harder,” more visible kind and the “softer,” more attitudinal and values-driven kind – revealed in the case.

I was reminded of the trilemma of focusing on My Way vs. Your Way vs. Our Way when collaborating and building buy-in in a global context. Whereas undoubtedly, to build trust you need to be yourself, authentic and honest. However, the My Way needs to be tempered with awareness and skills in understanding the Your Way of your global partners. Only in this way can you reflect on the best Our Way for turning positive intentions into effective communication, process and policy.

 

About Nigel Ewington

Nigel is a co-founding partner of TCO who has worked for over 20 years with over 100 organizations in the area of developing global agility.  He has developed a deep understanding of what organizations need to do in order to thrive and prosper in a complex, diverse and changing world. This has been honed by his experience of living and working in other countries, as well as his own agility in travelling around the world on assignments where on a week-to-week basis he needs to bring value to many different kinds of people in many different cultural and organisational contexts.

A key underlying gift that Nigel brings to TCO clients is how to get the best out of themselves and others when managing change across geographic and organizational boundaries. Here he has built a strong reputation as a presenter, trainer and facilitator, from the very largest events on the theme of global leadership down to small, compact leadership teams that are looking increase productivity in terms of how they work together. He has been instrumental in creating the signature concepts, models and activities that make TCO original and unique.

 

Topics: global mobility policy, global mobility, global assignments, communication

Brexit's Impact on Global Mobility

Posted by CapRelo on Thu, Sep 13, 2018

Brexit

As Brexit and the impending withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union continues to be a major topic of discussion in the news, Mark Woelfel, CapRelo's Vice President of Global Development in our UK office, explains how it affects CapRelo's global mobility efforts:

While the negotiations of Brexit continue between Westminster and Brussels, we've continued to see the same trends over the past year in relation to its impact into the mobility space. There is a general reluctance towards making long-term talent acquisition strategies until there is more clarity around the terms of the deal, and a reduction by many multinational corporations to make long-term assignments around and into Europe. Since the announcement of Brexit, many countries in the EU (including the UK) have seen a tightening of immigration requirements—not so much in overall policies, but in the application of the regulations—more intense scrutiny of documentation, revisiting of immigration caps and schemes and a generally slower service in processing of individual immigration applications.

Savvy leaders in the mobility space continue to make exhaustive scenario planning around the possible outcomes and have been increasing the use of business travelers and short-term assignments to meet their immediate business objectives. In the UK in particular, we've seen reviews of UK Domestic programs, evaluating their fitness in light of not just changing legislation (such as new GDPR requirements), but for scalability as companies consider the need to utilize more local and regional talent to fill their open positions.

We remain in a "hope for the best and plan for the worst" environment, and CapRelo is assisting many companies in preparing for a variety of eventualities.

Managing Global Assignment Costs

Topics: Brexit, global mobility

Webinar - My Way, your Way, Our Way

Posted by CapRelo on Tue, Sep 11, 2018

September 2018 WERC Webinar 1


In a global marketplace, it's important for U.S.-based global mobility leaders to strike the right balance when working with global colleagues and customers.

Join us on Tuesday, September 18, 2018, at 11:00 a.m. ET for our WERC Learning Zone Webinar: My Way, Your Way, Our Way, where we will discuss a case study that encapsulates the pain points U.S. global mobility professionals have experienced when failing to get buy-in from their foreign counterparts.

In this webinar, you’ll learn:

  • Examples of situations global mobility professionals have experienced
  • The critical importance of understanding diverse assumptions about effective communication, rules vs. expectations and hierarchy
  • How to strike the right balance to communicate effectively

 

Webinar presenters:

Chris Finckel
VP, Client Development
CapRelo

Nigel Ewington
TCO International

 

CapRelo presents this free webinar through the WERC Learning Zone so you can learn more about creating a successful global mobility policy. This webinar is good for CRP, GMS credit.

Register today for our September 18th Learning Zone Webinar: My Way, Your Way, Our Way.

Topics: caprelo webinars, Relocation Services, global mobility, global relocation, WorldwideERC

Global Mobility Snapshot

Posted by CapRelo on Thu, Aug 09, 2018

Millions of American workers relocate annually, many taking on international assignments as businesses develop and broaden their global mobility programs to take advantage of the expanding global economy. Here is a snapshot of global mobility in 2018.

Global Mobility Snapshot Infographic

Topics: global mobility, global mobility policy, talent mobility

5 Important Topics to Include in a Global Assignment Letter of Understanding

Posted by Amy Mergler on Thu, Jul 19, 2018

Image of businessman at airport looking at airplane taking offOne way to help ensure global assignment success is to prepare an effective global assignment letter of understanding that outlines the pertinent details and benefits of the assignment in a way that leaves no room for misinterpretation. 

After your letter of understanding addresses specific information regarding the scope of the assignment, you can delve into the specifics of your global mobility policy and explain the benefits the employee will receive.

Explain Your Global Mobility Policy

Your letter should summarize the portions of your global mobility policy that are applicable to the employee. Among the issues your policy addresses, it is important to include information on the five topics below because they are:

  • The most costly components of an assignment or transfer and
  • Usually the greatest stressors to an employee, which can cause reduced productivity.

Relocation Expenses

When writing the letter, review your policies to determine what is relevant to the particular employee. While it’s not recommended to copy your policy verbatim into the letter, you should summarize:

  • Specific expenses and the amounts the company pays for directly.
  • Types of expenses that can be reimbursed, along with any limits. Note whether the employee is required to document each expense, should submit a consolidated summary or will be given a lump sum amount for miscellaneous expenses.
  • The ongoing allowances for specific benefits.
  • Expenses the employee is responsible for paying.
  • Repayment agreement terms.

Moving Household Goods

Household goods shipments can be a significant part of your overall global relocation expense. The moving cost can vary widely depending upon whether the employee is relocating permanently or will be on assignment for a set length of time, the distance between the current and destination locations and the family size.

Global movement of household goods will typically include sea and air shipments and long-term storage. The letter of understanding should be clear on what is covered. Typical benefits include a 20-foot or 40-foot container and 500 pounds for an air shipment. Long-term storage is generally only provided for those on assignment, and for the length of the assignment.

The cost of storage and valuation coverage for household goods must also be considered. Your letter should specify the amount the company will pay for household goods transport, storage and valuation along with any limitations or restrictions.

Tax Implications and Assistance

Taxes Concept on File Label in Multicolor Card Index. Closeup View. Selective Focus.Global assignments and relocation can have significant tax implications. The letter of understanding should outline the assistance provided, which may include a pre-assignment/relocation orientation with a third-party tax provider, tax return preparation assistance and tax equalization. It should also include details on the employee’s and the company’s responsibilities. The company’s tax provider may also suggest including a tax equalization addendum that outlines the company’s policy to be signed by the employee.

Immigration

The letter of understanding should emphasize the importance of compliance with global immigration laws and should outline the assistance provided by the immigration partner or department. The employee’s responsibilities to provide accurate and timely information and to follow all instructions regarding travel limitations of the host country should be clearly documented. The assignment or relocation cannot begin until required immigration documents are obtained.

Housing and Settling In Assistance

Getting your employee and their family settled into a new residence is crucial because it helps them to return to full productivity quickly. Each employee is unique. Some may need temporary housing while they search for a new residence. Your letter should reflect the level of assistance the company provides.

  • Temporary Housing: Summarize what provisions the company makes for temporary living and for how long.
  • Home Finding Travel: Summarize the assistance the company provides, such as home finding trips. Include the number of trips allowed, the expenses covered and the family members approved.
  • Destination Services: Summarize the services the company provides, which might include home finding assistance, orientation to the new area, contacts with local schools, colleges, medical facilities, etc.
  • Long-Term Housing (Assignments Only): Summarize the housing assistance provided, including monthly housing allowance based on family size and location, method of payment, utilities included and employee responsibilities for maintenance and upkeep.

Ideally, your letter of understanding should focus on the employee and the benefits of the new role while creating a positive impression and enthusiasm for the new opportunity. Make sure to outline the expectations and responsibilities in the new role to avoid any possible misunderstanding. Explain and summarize the relevant points from your global mobility policy, paying particular attention to the five topics discussed above.

Writing an International Letter of Understanding

Topics: global mobility, global assignments, global mobility management, letter of understanding, global mobility policy

Best practices for Writing a Global Assignment Letter Of Understanding

Posted by Amy Mergler on Thu, Jul 12, 2018

reeditor-2015-singapore-flying-high-for-global-mobility_3566Relocating globally or going on an assignment for a job is considered a major life event because it often requires an employee selling a home before moving the family to a new country and changing many of their typical routines. Your employee letter of understanding must cover a number of important topics, but without increasing your employee's anxiety.

A letter of understanding outlines the details and benefits of the assignment. This legally binding document basically serves as an addendum to the employee’s regular employment contract and lays out any varying or additional terms that apply for the duration of the assignment. As such, it must be signed by all parties. In addition to the assignment start and end date, job title and location, the letter of assignment must specify all contractual agreements, code of conduct, compensation and benefits, assignment-specific benefits such as moving expenses and repatriation allowance, tax equalization and other fiscal matters.

It’s important that the letter of understanding lay out all pertinent details of an assignment in a way that leaves no room for misinterpretation. Any lack of clarity could lead to misunderstanding, which in turn could lead to costly and time-consuming problems. This can be a drain on resources, and it can create a distraction for the employee and impact the success of the assignment.

The key to drafting effective letters of understanding begins with knowing your employees and focusing on them and their families. You can find sample templates on the internet to help you draft a letter of understanding, but unfortunately, many of them begin something like this:

Dear Mr. Jones,

This letter is to inform you that you will be transferred effective [date] to our location in...

Considering the upheaval a relocation will cause in your employee's life, this approach is rather abrupt. Here are some best practices to help you write an effective letter of understanding.

Discuss the Global Relocation or Assignment First

team of successful business people having a meeting in executive sunlit officeYour company has made the decision to relocate or send an employee on assignment to benefit the organization in some way. You may need to add talent to a business unit in another city, or to reduce it at the employee’s current location. You may want to move a manager to provide new leadership in another territory. You may even want to give a high-potential employee broader experience as part of a career development plan. No matter the reason, be sure you or the appropriate manager(s) discuss those reasons with the employee long before you write the letter.

Having a detailed discussion provides an opportunity to create enthusiasm about a new role by:

  • Increasing the likelihood of an accepted offer.
  • Providing a platform to discuss your global mobility policy and company-provided financial assistance.
  • Clarifying the specific skill-building and learning opportunities available in the new role.
  • Showing that the company values the employee and wants to make an investment in his or her future.
  • Demonstrating that the employee is important to the growth of the business.

Holding a preliminary discussion shows respect for the employee and allows you to craft a letter tailored to that individual. In turn, you’re more likely to increase loyalty and productivity — and reduce the chance of a relocation offer being declined.

Outline the New Role

Your employee’s job title and responsibilities may remain the same in the new location. If that is the case, make sure the transfer letter of understanding includes the name of the person to whom the employee will report and the duration of the transfer or assignment. For employees taking on new responsibilities, you’ll also want to include the following:

  • The employee's new job title or position.
  • A description of any increased benefits, salary or bonuses.

Similar in some ways to an employment offer letter to a prospective new employee, this portion of the letter of understanding focuses on the specifics of the new role. It documents the job title, salary and related matters to eliminate misunderstandings later. The letter should be dated and signed by the appropriate manager, and be sure the letter contains:

  • The employee's full name and current home address.
  • Department names — both the current department and the new destination department.
  • The effective date the employee should report to the new location.
  • The anticipated end date in the case of an assignment.
  • The name of the employee's new supervisor.
  • The date by which the individual relocation and assignment benefits must be used.

After you proved this pertinent information, you can delve into the specifics of your company's global mobility policy and explain the benefits the employee will receive. Check back next week to learn about the five most important topics to include in your global assignment employee letter of understanding.

Writing an International Letter of Understanding

Topics: global assignments, global mobility management, letter of understanding, global mobility

Streamline Global Mobility Success: Increase Efficiency and Lessen Risk

Posted by Amy Mergler on Mon, Jul 02, 2018

Process Optimization on the Mechanism of Metal Gears.All successful endeavors are the result of an efficient operation or organization. Coherence, order and precision oil the wheels of process and reveal the value of efficiency. A company with high organizational capacity is one that can deliver. This is especially true for global mobility management.

When you engage with a successful mobility management firm, you reap the benefits of solution-based practices, better focus and a strong and vetted support network. Outsourcing your mobility management services takes the heavy lifting off of your hands so you can spend time and resources on the big picture: continuing your company's success. Ultimately, handing over the reins to a trusted and seasoned mobility company provides faster decision-making capabilities, quicker response times and a significantly reduced exposure to the risks involved in this process. 

A professional and experienced global mobility management company streamlines all internal business processes and becomes your number one resource for a smooth transition.

Efficiency Matters

Citing research that close to 50% of employees are still under the impression that global mobility management services are intended merely for supporting those relocating, HRO Today reported that providing strategic and expert advice to company leaders and stakeholders should now be an expectation in the industry. Rather than waste time and resources on an overly bureaucratic and complex system, you want a mobility management company that gets things done in a smart, fast and practical manner. You also want a provider that can deliver on tactical analysis benefiting your company's business decisions, talent acquisition and bottom line.

Consider the benefits your company can gain by working with a reputable global mobility management company:

1. Response Time

Working with a global mobility management company that understands your organization and its specific needs fosters a trusted partnership. The opportunity to build a relationship with a seasoned single point of contact who identifies with your company's unique strategies can really set a mobility company apart from the competition. Having that single point of contact is not just beneficial for human resources and company leaders, but for the relocating employee as well.

2. Streamlined Solutions

When you're in the midst of a relocation, there can be a lot of moving pieces and important milestones. Regardless of what you're managing, you need a digital solution that offers quick, easy and seamless access to all of your information in one place. It is essential to have data for suppliers and orders, taxes and payroll, and policies and process controls under one roof to manage relocations efficiently. Furthermore, when integrating sensitive data, it is also imperative to ensure the protection of the company and your employees.

A streamlined solution can help automate tasks and processes while keeping your company on track to reach financial goals, deadlines and business objectives.

3. Alignment with Business Strategy

As detailed by Deloitte in its "Global Business Driven HR Transformation" report, global mobility management solutions are no longer effective as a one-size-fits-all formula. Instead, a carefully crafted plan specifically tailored to your business needs is essential to achieve your goals and bolster talent development, helping to ensure success before, during and after the relocation. When a global mobility management company is efficient in its operations, companies can benefit from the focus on unique strategies and goals, as well as most cost-effectively utilizing existing talent.

Global mobility management companies capable of delivering knowledgeable and seasoned guidance to your organization are crucial in matching business and talent development, according to Deloitte's findings. Proper guidance ensures that relocations and assignments are based on insightful research and planning, sending the right employees on the right endeavors.

According to The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), talent management ranks as the number one worry among most companies. The data highlights the need for a global mobility management company to work successfully in tandem with an organization's existing talent management program. This supplements the current initiatives to boost productivity and drive competition.

4. Reduced Risk

Rather than trying to navigate compliance, legalities and the fine print on your own, work with the expert itself: a global mobility management company. Collaborating with a group of experienced professionals that will dive right in and get the job done not only increases efficiency, but lowers risk as well.

According to calculations from FIDI (the largest global alliance of professional international moving and relocation companies), failed overseas assignments are not uncommon and they can result in costly financial burdens of up to US $400,000. When you include airfare, salary and bonuses, school tuition, housing costs, transportation needs, visa fees, ancillary charges and the taxes associated with these reimbursements, mobility is an expensive investment for any company to make. To help secure a return on this investment, it's imperative to partner with an experienced, trusted and efficient global mobility management company.

Leaning on the expertise of a global mobility management company can make a positive difference in the moving and adjustment period for employees. As Deloitte explains, professional services and resources that help employees and their families during a relocation are much more likely to reduce the risk of failed assignments.

 

When you want your company's business to continue full steam ahead during a relocation, engaging with an efficient global mobility management company can help deliver ideal response times, streamlined solutions, alignment with your business strategy and reduced risk. When you choose the right mobility management partner, you can be confident your business will meet or surpass its goals.

Streamline Success

Topics: global mobility, mobility management company, mobility management, global mobility management, global mobility management company

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